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ISITYOF ILLINOIS BULLETIN 

December 29, 1936 No. 35 



Annual 
Farm and 
Home 
Week 
Program 



January 11 to 15 
1937 



College of Agriculture 
University of Illinois 
Urbana-Champaign 



Published Twice a Week by the University of Illinois 

Entered as second-class matter December 11, 1912, at the 
post office at Urbana, Illinois, under the Act of August 24, 
1912. Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage 
provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, au- 
thorized July 31, 1918. 



INFORMATION FOR VISITORS 

Registration — Every visitor is urged to register im- 
mediately upon arrival. There is no registration fee. 
Registration headquarters will be maintained in the 
University Auditorium during the entire week. At the 
time of registering you will be given an official Farm and 
Home Week badge. 

Conference Hour — Except where special conferences 
are listed, the hour 8 to 9 each morning has been 
reserved for conference with members of the College 
staff or others. Inquire at the registration desk for assist- 
ance in locating anyone you may wish to see. 

Exhibits — Farm and Home Week guests should avail 
themselves of the opportunity of visiting the many 
exhibits on the campus pertaining to subjects of both 
agricultural and general interest. A brief description of 
the exhibits will be found at the back of this program. 

Meals — Meals may be secured at numerous restau- 
rants near the University campus. Noon lunch will be 
served at the Home Economics Cafeteria in the Woman's 
Building. The basement gymnasium will be open to any- 
one who cares to bring his lunch. Coffee, soup, milk and 
fruit may be obtained there. Announcements will be made 
at the Auditorium. 

Rooms — A list of rooms available in the University 
district for Farm and Home Week visitors will be main- 
tained at the registration desk in the Auditorium. 

Lost and Found — Articles lost should be reported 
and those found turned in to registration headquarters in 
the Auditorium. 

Illness and Accidents — Illness or accidents should be 
promptly reported to the registration desk in the Audi- 
torium. First aid service will be rendered by the Univer- 
sity Health Station, telephone 7-1821. 



Unless otherwise indicated, speakers 
are members of the College of Agri- 
culture staff in the department by 
which the program is offered. 



[ 2 ] 



COURSES IN 
AGRICULTURE 

(For Homemakers' Conference, see page 17) 



(For Pastors' and Laymen's Conference, see page 22) 

(For Illinois Farm Managers Association Conference, 

see page 23) 



MONDAY— JANUARY 11 



Monday — 9:00 a.m. 

Registration — Auditorium 

Monday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Ten years of farming on 57 farms. M. L. 
Mosher (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — (With Homemakers' Conference) Selecting 
electrical equipment. R. R. Parks (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Making the supply of legume seeds go farther. 
J. C. Hackleman (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Recent facts about roughage for livestock. 
B. W. Fairbanks (107 Genetics) 
Poultry clinic* (Flock owners are invited to bring 
specimens for autopsy.) Robert Graham, C. A. 
Brandly, and G. L. Dunlap. (An. Path. Lab.) 

4-H Club Work — Working with young people. A. B. Gra- 
ham, Extension Service, U.S.D.A., Washington, D. C. 
(128 New Agr.) 



Monday — 2:00 p.m. 



Agr. Econ. — Cost of producing grain and hay crops. R. H. 
Wilcox (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Fitting the farm house to modern equipment. 
W. A. Foster (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Recent developments in industrial uses of soy- 
beans. O. E. May, Director, Regional Soybean Indus- 
trial Products Laboratory, U.S.D.A., Urbana (600 Old 
Agr.) 

An. Husb. — From egg cell to cow. (Illustrated) E. 
Roberts (107 Genetics) 

Poultry clinic* Robert Graham, C. A. Brandly, and 
G. L. Dunlap (An. Path. Lab.) 



*Programs designated by an asterisk are not completed in one 
hour. See preceding or following schedules for full program. 

[ 3 ] 



Monday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
E. W. Lehmann, presiding 

European agriculture from highways and byways. 
(Illustrated with motion pictures) G. W. McCuen, 
Chairman, Department of Agricultural Engineering, 
Ohio State University, Columbus 

The program will be opened with group singing led by 
E. I. Pilchard. 



Monday — 4:30 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Agricultural economics question box hour. 
(103 New Agr.) 



Monday — 5:30 p.m. 

Farm and Home Week Banquet — McKinley Foundation 

Washing our dishes together. H. D. Hughes, Professor 
of Farm Crops, Iowa State College, Ames 



TUESDAY— JANUARY 12 

Tuesday— 8:00 a.m. ■ 

(Conference hour) 

Agr. Econ. — Experiences in Illinois cooperation. 

The depot system of milk distribution. R. R. Book- 
walter, President, Danville Producers Creamery, 
Danville. Operation of a cooperative centralizer 
creamery. G. P. Southwell, General Manager, 
Farmers' Equity Union Creamery, Pana (103 New 
Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Conference: Your building problems. W. A. 
Foster (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Conference: Good practices in sowing small- 
seeded legumes. G. H. Dungan (600 Old Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — The process of change from neighborhood 
to regional organization and its effect on rural life. 
W. R. Tylor, Department of Sociology (214 New 
Agr.) 

Tuesday— 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Management problems resulting from quality 
control programs.* 

Chicago milk sales area. John P. Case, President, 
Pure Milk Association, Chicago. Increased milk 
prices resulting from production of high-quality 
milk. R. W. Bartlett. Peoria milk sales area. 
Wilfred Shaw, Director of Dairy Marketing, Illi- 
nois Agricultural Association, Chicago. Motion 
pictures of the activities of Sanitary Milk Producers. 
A. D. Lynch, Secretary-Manager, Sanitary Milk 
Producers, St. Louis. (103 New Agr.) 

[ 4 ] 



Agr. Engin. — Seed cleaning and grading; methods and 
machines. C. W. VEACH (201 A (jr. Engin.) 

Agron., An. Hi'sn., & DAIRY— Our pasture investigation 
program. W. L. Buri.ison, Agron. Soil as a basis 
for pasture production. C. M. Linsley, Agron. (Audi' 
torium) 

An. Husb. — The mortality problem in poultry. L. E. Card 
(316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — What happens in a bee's year. V. G. Milum 
(104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Improved methods for making 
cottage cheese at home.* S. L. Tuckey (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Hort. — Popcorn for home use. B. L. Weaver (128 New 
Agr.) 

Physiology of the strawberry in relation to fruitfulness.* 
M. J. Dorsey (127 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Population trends affecting programs in 
resettlement. V. B. Fielder, Illinois State Land Plan- 
ning Specialist, Land Utilization Division, Resettle- 
ment Administration, Urbana. Discussion led by D. E. 
Lindstrom (214 New Agr.) 



Tuesday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Management problems resulting from quality 
control programs.* (103 New Agr.) (Continued from 
9 a.m. For details, see above) 

Agr. Engin. — Seed cleaning demonstrations. C. W. Veach 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron., An. Husb., & Dairy — Choosing pasture plants. 
V. G. Sprague, Agron. Utilization of pasture plants in 
mixtures. J. J. Pieper, Agron. The pasture from the 
dairyman's viewpoint. W. B. Nevens and W. W. Yapp, 
Dairy. Importance of insects in a pasture program. 
J. H. Bigger, Field Entomologist, State Natural His- 
tory Survey (Auditorium) 

An. Husb. — Housing in relation to flock health. H. M. 
Scott. Flock management for vigor and health. H. H. 
Alp (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — The body of the bee and how it works. V. G. 
Milum (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Improved methods for making 
cottage cheese at home.* S. L. Tuckey (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Forestry — Forestry in the agricultural conservation pro- 
gram. J. E. Davis (118 New Agr.) 

Hort. — Trees and shrubs for the farm home. M. G. 
Fuller (128 New Agr.) 

Physiology of the strawberry in relation to fruitfulness.* 
M. J. Dorsey (127 New Agr.) 



Tuesday — 11:45 a.m. 

Motion pictures — Auditorium 
[ 5 ] 



Tuesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — The place of livestock in good farm manage- 
ment. J. B. Andrews (103 New Agr.) 
Management problems resulting from quality control 
programs.* 

St. Louis milk sales area. E. W. Tiedeman, Presi- 
dent, Sanitary Milk Producers, St. Louis. Bloom- 
ington milk sales area. Forrest Fairchild, Manager, 
McLean County Milk Producers Association, Bloom- 
ington. Rockford milk sales area. H. W. Mainland, 
Director, Mid-West Dairymen's Association, Rock- 
ford. General discussion (107 Genetics) 

Agr. Engin. — Harvesting, curing, and storing hay. R. H. 
Reed (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron., An. Husb., & Dairy — Pastures for beef, cattle. 
H. P. Rusk, An Husb. Pastures for sheep. W. G. 
Kammlade, An. Husb. Pastures for hogs. W. E. 
Carroll, An. Husb. (Auditorium) 

An. Husb. — Breeding for health and longevity. E. Roberts 
(316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Choosing and assembling equipment. G. H. 
Cale, Editor, American Bee Journal, Hamilton (104 
Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: How to avoid common defects in 
milk and cream. P. H. Tracy (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Forestry — Wood chopping contest.* (The winner and 
runner-up will be eligible from each county where a 
contest was held in 1936 in connection with woodland 
improvement demonstration meetings. Contestants are 
to furnish their own axes and there is no limit on 
weight or pattern of the ax.) (Stock Pavilion) 

Hort. — Newer strawberry varieties. A. S. Colby (127 New 
Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Financing the rural school.* E. L. Co- 
berly, Director of Research and Statistics, Office of 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, Springfield (214 
Neiv Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — Working with young people. A. B. 
Graham, Extension Service, U.S.D.A., Washington, 
D. C. (128 New Agr.) 



Tuesday — 2:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Problems of tenant farming. Joseph Acker- 
man (103 New Agr.) 
Management problems resulting from quality control 
programs.* (107 Genetics) (Continued from 1:00 
p.m. For details, see above) 

Agr. Engin. — Storing grain crops. W. A. Foster (201 Agr. 
Engin. ) 

Agron., An. Husb., & Dairy — Pasture management. H. D. 
Hughes, Professor of Farm Crops, Iowa State Col- 
lege, Ames (Auditorium) 

An. Husb. — Crossbreeding in practice. H. M. Scott (316 
New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Demonstration: A trip inside the hive. 
Honey extracting. (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 



[6 ] 



l>\iu\ Demonstration: Manufacture of special dairy 
products for the farm dairy- -milk drinks, spreads, etc. 

\V. I. C0RBETT (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Forestry — Wood chopping contest.* (Stock Pavilion) 
(Continued from 1:00 p.m. For details, see above) 

Hokt. Secrets of success in home gardening. L. A. 
Somers (12S New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Financing the rural school.* E. L. Co- 
berly, Director of Research and Statistics, Office of 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, Springfield (214 
New Agr.) 

Tuesday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

J. C. Blair, presiding 

The state of the world today and the outlook for inter- 
national peace. J. W. Garner, Head, Department 
of Political Science, University of Illinois 

The program will be opened with group singing led by 
H. R. Brunnemeyer 



Tuesday — 4:30 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Agricultural economics question box hour. 
(103 New Agr.) 

Tuesday — 5:30 p.m. 

Stockmen's Banquet — Bradley Arcade 

Address — W. C. Coffey, Dean, Department of Agriculture, 
University of Minnesota, St. Paul 



Tuesday— 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 
R. R. Hudelson, presiding 

Music — University Men's Glee Club, directed by Le Roy R. 
Hamp 

A vacation in Alaska. (Illustrated with motion pic- 
tures) C. F. Hottes, Head, Department of Botany, 
University of Illinois 



WEDNESDAY— JANUARY 13 



Wednesday — 8:00 a.m. 

(Conference hour) 

Agr. Econ. — Experiences in Illinois cooperation. 

Distributing farm supplies thru a county association. 
E. D. Lawrence, McLean County Farm Supply 
Company, Bloomington. A glance at consumer 
cooperatives in Scotland and England. R. C. Ashby 
(103 New Agr.) 

[ 7 ] 



Agr. Engin. — Rural electrification progress in Illinois. 
E. W. Lehmann. Home management problems with 
and without electricity. Gladys Ward, Home Ec. 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron., An. Husb., & Dairy — Conference: Round table 
discussion of pasture problems. W. L. Burlison, 
Agron. (600 Old Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Fall and winter management of bees V. G. 
Milum (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Rural Organ. — The effect of population changes on rural 
life. D. E. Lindstrom (214 New Agr.) 



Wednesday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Management problems of farmers' business 
organizations.* L. J. Norton, chairman and discussion 
leader. 
How standards are used to promote efficiency in local 
farm supply companies. F. E. Herndon, President, 
Illinois Farm Supply Company, Macomb. How ac- 
counting and auditing contribute to development of 
efficient business standards. F. E. Ringham, Man- 
ager, Illinois Agricultural Auditing Association, Chi- 
cago. How we use budgets of expense and income 
in planning our operations. M. E. Volle, Secretary- 
Treasurer, Champaign Production Credit Associa- 
tion, Champaign. How the Illinois Agricultural Ser- 
vice Company applies standards to the operating 
results of affiliated companies. G. E. Metzger, Field 
Secretary and Organization Director, Illinois Agri- 
cultural Association, Chicago. What a director needs 
to know in order to check the efficiency of a local 
cooperative grain business. J. Fred Romine, Presi- 
dent, Tuscola Cooperative Grain Company, Tuscola. 
What our loan experience indicates about the desir- 
ability of management standards. D. M. Hardy, 
President, St. Louis Bank for Cooperatives, St. 
Louis (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Equipment selection and use in the home. 
Fedelia Taylor, Rural Electrification Administration, 
Washington, D. C. (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Hybrid corn performance tests. W. J. Mumm and 
J. R. Holbert, Senior Agronomist, Bureau of Plant 
Industry, U.S.D.A., Bloomington (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Judging weanling draft foals. J. L. Edmonds 
and C. W Crawford (Stock Pavilion) 

Recent findings in poultry research. L. E. Card (316 
New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Spring and summer management. G. H. 
Cale, Editor, American Bee Journal, Hamilton (104 
Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Manufacture of American Ched- 
dar cheese on the farm.* B. F. Whitmore (Dairy 
Mfrs.) 

Uncle Sam's three dairy herds. W. J. Fraser (107 
Genetics) 

Hort. — (With Homemakers' Conference) How to buy 
vegetables. J. W. Lloyd (Morrow Hall) 
Harvesting and packing strawberries.* V. W. Kelley 
(127 New Agr.) 

[8] 



Rural ORGAN.— Present status of programs of rehabilita- 
tion in place. W. E. Johns, Assistant Regional Di- 
rector in charge of Rural Rehabilitation, Resettlement 
Administration, Indianapolis. Discussion led by W. J. 
CARMICHAEL, State Rural Rehabilitation Director, Re- 
settlement Administration, Champaign (214 Nczv Ayr.) 



Wednesday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Management problems of farmers' business 
organizations.* L. J. Norton, chairman and discussion 
leader (103 Nezv Agr.) (Continued from 9:00 a.m. 
For details, see above) 

Agr. Engin. — Will electricity pay with poultry? H. H. 
Alp, An. Husb. Electricity helps produce better milk. 
M. J. Prucha, Dairy. (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Developments in hybrid corn production. M. T. 
Jenkins, Principal Agronomist, Bureau of Plant In- 
dustry, U.S.D.A., Washington, D. C. Good hybrid corn 
needs good soil. A. L. Lang. The use of hybrid corn 
in reducing chinch bug damage. J. H. Bigger, Field 
Entomologist, State Natural History Survey (600 Old 
Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Modern horse-breeding practices. Wayne 

Dinsmore, Secretary, Horse and Mule Association of 

America, Chicago. Recent advances in knowledge of 

horse diseases. Robert Graham (Stock Pavilion) 

Physiology of the fowl in relation to flock management. 

B. R. Burm ester. New facts about egg marketing. 

H. H. Alp (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — How I manage my bees. C. L. Duax, Chief 
Apiary Inspector, Chicago (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Manufacture of American Ched- 
dar cheese on the farm.* B. F. Whitmore (Dairy 
Mfrs.) 
The breeding problems of the small dairyman and how 
to solve them. A. F. Kuhlman (107 Genetics) 

Forestry — Evergreen windbreaks for winter protection. 
J. E. Davis (118 New Agr.) 

Hort. — Flowering plants suited to the farm garden. S. W. 
Hall and J. H. Hanley (128 New Agr.) 
Harvesting and packing strawberries.* V. W. Kelley 
(127 New Agr.) 

Wednesday — 11:45 a.m. 

Motion pictures — Auditorium 

Wednesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Problems of adjustments on individual farms. 
J. E. Wills (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — When is a home well lighted? Dorothy 
Iwig, Home Ec. Good wiring is economy. A. H. 
Hemker, Power Engineer, Central Illinois Public 
Service Company, Mattoon (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — The grasshopper control campaign for 1937. 
W. P. Flint, Entom. Seed corn treatment for disease 
control. Benjamin Koehler (600 Old Agr.) 



[ 9] 



An. Husb. — Horse breeding in France and Belgium. A. L. 
Robison, Jr., Leslie Farms, Pekin {Stock Pavilion) 
Some new facts about feeding for health. B. R. Bur- 
mester (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Honey— what is it? V. G. Milum (104 Exp. 
Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Manufacture of American Ched- 
dar cheese on the farm.* B. F. Whitmore (Dairy 
Mfrs.) 

Cooperative bull associations as a means of herd im- 
provement. C. S. Rhode (107 Genetics) 

Hort. — Cultural practices in strawberry production .* A. S. 
Colby (127 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Discussion team finals: How to improve 
our rural schools.* (214 New Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — Working with young people. A. B. Gra- 
ham, Extension Service, U.S.D.A., Washington, D. C. 
(128 New Agr.) 



Wednesday — 2:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Planning the farm for profitable operation. 
J. B. Cunningham (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Electricity for a nation. O. W. Meier, Rural 
Electrification Administration, Washington, D. C. 
Rural electrification developments in Illinois. W. H. 
Marple, State Rural Electrification Committee, Spring- 
field (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Storing seed corn effectively. G. H. Dungan and 
W. A. Foster, Agr. Engin. (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Care of feet and legs of horses. Dr. M. B. 
Mathers, Mason City (Stock Pavilion) 
Question box on feeding and related problems. Led by 
L. E. Card (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Honey in dairy products. P. H. Tracy 
(Dairy Mfrs.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Manufacture of American Ched- 
dar cheese on the farm.* B. F. Whitmore (Dairy 
Mfrs.) 
Systems of breeding that are sound and permanent. 
A. F. Kuhlman (107 Genetics) 

Hort. — Vegetable exhibits. L. A. Somers (128 New Agr.) 
Cultural practices in strawberry production.* A. S. 
Colby (127 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Discussion team finals: How to improve 
our rural schools.* (214 Nezv Agr.) 



Wednesday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

Lita Bane, presiding 

Problems of the retail buyer. Pauline Beery Mack, 
Director, Home Economics Research, Pennsylvania 
State College, State College 

The program will be opened with vocal selections by 

T7T ARTTMr^T? T<TtTVT 1MT7T 5H TTP 



Florence Kimmelshue. 

[10] 



Wednesday — 4:30 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Agricultural economics question box hour. 

(214 New Agr.) 
Agr. Engin. — Suitable equipment for the electrified farm. 

Panel discussion led by Richard BoONSTRA, Public 

Service Company of Northern Illinois, Maywood (201 

Agr. Engin.) 
Rural Organ. — Discussion team finals: How to improve 

our rural schools.* (103 Neiv Agr.) 

Wednesday — 5:15 p.m. 

Agr. Engin. — A coordinated program of rural electrifica- 
tion in Illinois. Panel discussion led by W. H. Marple, 
State Rural Electrification Committee, Springfield (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Rural Organ. — Discussion team finals: How to improve 
our rural schools.* (103 New Agr.) 

Wednesday — 5:30 p.m. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association Banquet — Mc- 
Kinley Foundation 

Address — H. L. Westover, Senior Agronomist, Bureau of 
Plant Industry, U.S.D.A., Washington, D. C. 

Wednesday — 6:30 p.m. 

Rural Electrification Dinner — University Place Christian 
Church. 

Wednesday — 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — New Gymnasium 

G. S. Randall, presiding 
Winter Festival — Community sing and recreation. 



THURSDAY— JANUARY 14 
Thursday— 8:00 a.m. 

(Conference hour) 

Agr. Econ. — Experiences in Illinois cooperation. 

The growth of a local grain cooperative. G. L. 
Potter, President, Graymont Cooperative Associa- 
tion, Graymont. Beginnings in cooperative distribu- 
tion of grain. Harrison Fahrnkopf, Manager, 
Illinois Grain Corporation, Chicago (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Conference: Drving and storing seed corn. 
R. H. Reed and W. A. Foster (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Conference: Hybrid corn question box. C. M. 

Woodworth (600 Old Agr.) 
Beekeeping — Adult bee diseases and other pests. V. G. 

Milum. Diagnosing brood diseases of bees. G. H. 

Cale, Editor, American Bee Journal, Hamilton (104 

Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Rural Organ. — Problems in coordinating forces affecting 
rural life. D. E. Lindstrom (214 New Agr.) 

[11] 



Thursday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Outlook for Illinois farm products.* 

The domestic situation. E. J. Working. The foreign 
situation. G. L. Jordan. Crops. J. C. Hackleman, 
Agron. Livestock. P. E. Johnston (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. & Agr. Econ.— Selecting tractors and machin- 
ery to fit the farm. R. H. Reed, Agr. Engin. (201 Agr. 
Engin.) 

Agron. — What is soil conservation? F. A. Fisher, State 
Coordinator, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A., 
Urbana. Control of erosion by mechanical means. 
R. C. Hay, Agr. Engin. (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Alfalfa pasture for growing-fattening hogs.* 
W. E. Carroll (Stock Pavilion) 
Some common causes of paralysis in poultry. G. L. 
Dunlap (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Apiary inspection and disease control. C. L. 
Duax, Chief Apiary Inspector, Chicago (104 Exp. 
Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Buttermaking for the farm dairy.* 
H. A. Ruehe (Dairy Mfrs.) 
The udder, its structure and function in milk production. 
(Illustrated) W. W. Yapp (107 Genetics) 

Hort. — Practical means of controlling insects in the home 
garden. L. H. Shropshire, Field Entomologist, State 
Natural History Survey (128 New Agr.) 
Strawberry root rots and Blakemore yellows.* H. W. 
Anderson (127 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Problems involved in depopulating sub- 
marginal areas. R. C. Smith, Regional Director, Re- 
settlement Administration, Indianapolis. Discussion 
led by W. J. Carmichael, State Rural Rehabilitation 
Director, Resettlement Administration, Champaign 
(214 New Agr.) 

Music and Drama — Annual business meeting (218 New 
Agr.) 



Thursday — 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Outlook for Illinois farm products* (103 
New Agr.) (Continued from 9:00 a.m. For details, 
see above) 

Agr. Engin. & Agr. Econ. — Costs of labor, power, and 
machinery on Illinois farms. J. E. Wills, Agr. Econ. 
Efficiency and cost of operating combines. R. C. Ross, 
Agr. Econ., and H. P. Bateman, Agr. Engin. (201 
Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Use of legumes in soil conservation. O. H. Sears. 
Saving fertility by crop planning. E. E. DeTurk (600 
Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Alfalfa pasture for growing-fattening hogs.* 
W. E. Carroll. Winter rye pasture for fattening fall 
pigs. Wise Burroughs (Stock Pavilion) 
Respiratory diseases of chicks and hens. C. A. Brandly. 
The disease factor in flock mortality. Robert Gra- 
ham (316 New Agr.) 

[12] 



Beekeeping— Filtering honey and general markel prepara- 
tion. E. F. PETERSON, Secretary, Illinois State Bee- 
keepers Association, Kewanee. How shall we dispose 
of the crop? I. C. Evans, Decatur (104 Exp. Zool. 
Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: Bnttermaking for the farm dairy.* 
H. A. Ruehe (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Udders; identifying types and relation of types to pro- 
duction. (Illustrated) W. W. Yapp. Rudimentary 
udders ; some important observations in forecasting 
future development. J. G. Cash (107 Genetics) 

Hort. — Demonstration: Use of cut flowers in the home. 
H. B. Dorner (128 New Agr.) 
Strawberry root rots and Blakemore yellows.* H. W. 
Anderson (127 New Agr.) 

Thursday— 10:30 a.m. 

Rural Organ. — Business meeting for county chorus 
project (330 New Agr.) 



Thursday — 11:45 a.m. 

Motion pictures — Auditorium 



Thursday— 1:00 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Effect of erosion control in farm manage- 
ment. F. A. Fisher, State Coordinator, Soil Conserva- 
tion Service, U.S.D.A., Urbana (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Selecting the farm tractor. R. I. Shawl 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — Some effects of soil conservation practices on 
productivity. F. C. Bauer (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Crossbreeding in swine production. E. Roberts 
(Stock Pavilion) 
Internal parasites and their control. W. A. Billings, 
Department of Agriculture, University of Minnesota, 
St. Paul (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — Do we need organization? W. G. Duckwall, 
President, Illinois State Beekeepers Association, Jack- 
sonville. What of the future in beekeeping? W. W. 
Osborne, Treasurer, Illinois State Beekeepers Associa- 
tion, Hillsboro (104 Exp. Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Causes for variations in milk and cream tests. 
O. R. Overman (Dairy Mfrs.) 
Diseases of the udder, their care and treatment. L. E. 
Boley, An. Husb. (107 Genetics) 

Hort. — Strawberry insects and their control. M. D. 
Farrar, Research Entomologist, State Natural History 
Survey (127 New Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — Problems in getting community support 
for modern rural school programs. O. F. Patterson, 
Assistant Superintendent of Public Instruction, Spring- 
field (214 New Agr.) 

4-H Club Work — Working with young people. A. B. 
Graham, Extension Service, U.S.D.A., Washington, 
D. C. (128 New Agr.) 



[13] 



Thursday — 2:00 p.m. 



Agr. Econ. — Long-time agricultural adjustment. H. C. M. 
Case (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Tractor fuels, lubricants, high compression 
motors. R. I. Shawl (201 Agr. Engin^) * 

Agron. — Control of erosion by vegetation. C. A. Van 
Doren, Soil Conservationist (Research"), Soil Conser- 
vation Service, U.S.D.A., Urbana. The state extension 
program on soil conservation. C. M. Linsley (600 Old 
Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Molasses substituted for corn in rations for 
fattening swine. W. E. Carroll (Stock Pavilion) 
Practical methods of disease control. C. D. Carpenter, 
Leberle Laboratory, New York City (316 New Agr.) 

Beekeeping — The Illinois Honey Foundation. Demonstra- 
tion and discussions by Honey Hostesses. (104 Exp. 
Zool. Lab.) 

Dairy — Demonstration: How to make frozen desserts. 
P. H. Tracy (Dairy Mfrs.) 
The significance of mastitis and other udder disturb- 
ances to the city milk supply. M. J. Prucha (107 
Genetics) 

Hort. — Causes of spoilage in canned vegetables. F. W. 
Tanner, Head, Department of Bacteriology (128 New 
Agr.) 

Music and Drama — Music finals. (Smith Memorial Hall) 



Thursday — 3:00 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

W. L. Burlison, presiding 

We are never too old to learn. Irving Lorge, Teachers 
College, Columbia University, New York City 

The program will be opened with music by the farm 
advisers' quartet. 



Thursday— 4:30 p.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Agricultural economics question box hour. 
(103 New Agr.) 

Thursday — 5:30 p.m. 

Music and Drama — Dinner for participants in Music and 
Drama Tournament. (Cafeteria, Woman's Building) 



Thursday— 7:30 p.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

D. E. Lindstrom, presiding 

State Music and Drama Tournament 

An admission fee of 25 cents will be charged for the 
tournament. The proceeds will be used to help pay 
the expenses of the participating groups. 

[14] 




FRIDAY— JANUARY 15 



Friday— 8:00 a.m. 

(Conference hour) 

Agr. Econ. — Experiences in Illinois cooperation. 

Cooperation from the standpoint of the local ship- 
ping association. Charles Shuman, Sullivan. What 
county committees are expecting from their coopera- 
tives in the future. Roy Burrus, Chairman, Morgan 
County Livestock Committee, Arenzville. Coopera- 
tion from the standpoint of the terminal sales 
agency. H. H. Parke, President, Chicago Producers 
Commission Association, Chicago (103 New Agr.) 

Agron. & Agr. Engin. — Conference: Fitting the soil con- 
servation program to the individual farm. C. M. 
Linsley, Agron. (600 Old Agr.) 

Rural Organ. — The place of recreation in rural life. E. H. 
Regnier (214 New Agr.) 

Friday — 9:00 a.m. 

Agr. EcoN. : ^Crop insurance problems * 

insurance plans in California, Kansas, and 
Canada. W. J. Wills. Insect damage to Illinois 
crops. W. P. Flint, Entom. Ability of plants to 
recover after damage. G. H. Dungan, Agron. Good 
soil management as insurance against low yields. 
A. L. Lang, Agron. Can crop insurance be practical 
in the corn belt? C. L. Stewart. General discus- 
sion. (103 New Agr.) 

Agr. Engin. — Planning your terracing. R. C. Hay. Gully 
control practice. E. C. Freyburger, Agricultural En- 
gineer, Soil Conservation Service, U.S.D.A., Urbana 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — The weed problem in Illinois. J. J. Pieper. Re- 
cent bindweed eradication experiments. L. V. Sher- 
wood (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Results of 1936 lamb feeding tests. W. G. 
Kammlade. Market values and prospects for lambs. 
S. Anglin, Chicago Producers Commission Associa- 
tion, Chicago (Stock Pavilion) 
Turkey disease problems. C. D. Carpenter, Leberle 
Laboratory, New York City (316 New Agr.) 

Dairy — Selecting dairy calves for club members. (Pro- 
gram intended for club leaders, farm advisers, and 
others interested in club work) W. W. Yapp (Stock 
Pavilion) 
Symposium on the improvement of the quality of milk 
supplies in the state of Illinois.* H. A. Ruehe. 
The importance of properly supervised milk supplies 
from the health officer's viewpoint. Dr. F. J. Jirka, 
Director, Department of Public Health, Springfield. 
The importance of properly supervised milk supplies 
from the producer's viewpoint. Wilfred Shaw, 
Director of Dairy Marketing, Illinois Agricultural 
Association, Chicago. The importance of properly 
supervised milk supplies from the distributor's view- 
point. C. H. Snow, Snow and Palmer Dairy, Bloom- 
ington. The extent of supervision of milk supplies 

[15] 



in Illinois as compared with other leading dairy 
states. W. W. McLaughlin, Director, Department 
of Agriculture, Springfield. Important factors to be 
considered in the establishment of sanitary regula- 
tions for milk and milk products in the state of 
Illinois. H. A. Ruehe (Dairy Mfrs.) 

Rural Organ. — Problems in getting people located in new 
areas. P. G. Beck, Assistant Regional Director in 
charge of projects, Resettlement Administration, In- 
dianapolis. Discussion led by Mrs. W. E. Johns, 
Assistant Supervisor of Rural Research, Works Prog- 
ress Administration, Urbana (214 New Agr.) 



Friday— 10:00 a.m. 

Agr. Econ. — Crop insurance problems* (103 New Agr.) 
(Continued from 9:00 a.m. For details, see above) 

Agr. Engin. — Why are wet spots increasing in Illinois 
farm fields? T. A. Pitzen, Junior Civil Engineer, 
U.S.D.A., Urbana. Drainage maintenance methods. 
E. W. Lehmann (201 Agr. Engin.) 

Agron. — County seed wheat improvement program. J. C. 
Hackleman; W. D. Murphy, Edwards County Farm 
Adviser, Albion; T. W. May, Madison County Farm 
Adviser, Edwardsville ; C. A. Hughes, Monroe County 
Farm Adviser, Waterloo (600 Old Agr.) 

An. Husb. — Experiences and observations concerning 
lamb feeding. Adam McWilliam, Toulon. Sheep 
breeding and feeding. William Duncan, Marellbar 
Farm, Libertyville (Stock Pavilion) 
Making money from turkeys. W. A. Billings, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, University of Minnesota, St. 
Paul. Management of the turkey breeding flock. 
H. M. Scott (316 New Agr.) 

Dairy — Caring for, fitting, and showing the club calf. 

(Program intended for club leaders, farm advisers, 

and others interested in club work) A. F. Kuhlman. 

Development of club calves into purebred herds. 

W. W. Yapp (Stock Pavilion) 

Symposium on the improvement of the quality of milk 

supplies in the state of Illinois.* H. A. Ruehe 

(Dairy Mfrs.) (Continued from 9:00 a.m. For 

details, see above) 

Hort. — Discussion: Flower garden problems. Led by F. F. 
Weinard (128 New Agr.) 



Friday — 11:00 a.m. 

General Session — Auditorium 

Dean H. W. Mumford, presiding 

Some things we can learn from Europe. C. V. Gregory, 
Editor, Prairie Farmer, Chicago 

The program will be opened with music by the agricul- 
tural faculty quartet. 



[16] 



HOMEMAKERS' 
CONFERENCE 

Monday — January 11 

Monday— 9:00 a.m. 
Registration — Auditorium 

Monday — 1:00 p.m. 

Planning three meals a day. 1 Harriet Barto (Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 

Wise use of credit. 1 L. J. Norton, Agr. Econ. (210 
Woman's Bldg.) 

Selecting electrical equipment. 1 R. R. Parks, Agr. Engin. 
(201 Agr. Engin.) 

Monday — 2:00 p.m. 

Personality development in the home. 1 H. H. Anderson, 
Department of Psychology (210 Woman's Bldg.) 

Nutrition and good health. 1 Milicent Hathaway (Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 

Monday — 3:00 p.m. 
General Session — Auditorium 



Tuesday — January 12 



Tuesday— 9:00 a.m. 

Round table: 

Values of long-time home accounts (117 Woman's 

Bldg.) 
Tenant-owner relations. (121 Woman's Bldg.) 
Farm home markets (304 Woman's Bldg.) 

Old glass as a hobby 1 Mrs. W. C. Rose, Urbana (210 
Woman's Bldg.) 

What is a well-fitted garment? 1 Mrs. Mary Beam (Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 

Tuesday— 10:00 a.m. 

General Session for Homemakers — Lincoln 
Hall Theater 

Roll call by counties 

Trends in home economics. Mrs. Kathryn VanAken 
Burns 

Stories of American music. Fannie Buchanan, Exten- 
sion Assistant, Rural Sociology in Rural Organization, 
Iowa State College, Ames 

1 Repeated at a later session. 

[17] 



Tuesday— 1:00 p.m. 

Business session, Illinois Home Bureau Federation.* 
Mrs. J. V. Stevenson, President, presiding (Morroiv 
Hall) 

Question clinic — construction, materials, and small houses. 1 
L. H. Provine, Head, Department of Architecture 
(120 Arch.) 

Old glass as a hobby. Mrs. W. C. Rose, Urbana (210 
Woman's Bldg.) 



Tuesday— 2:00 p.m. 

Business session, Illinois Home Bureau Federation.* Mrs. 
J. V. Stevenson, President, presiding (Morrow Hall) 

Selecting varieties of soybeans for use as food. 1 Sybil 
Woodruff (Lincoln Hall Theater) 

Appreciation of radio symphony music. 1 F. B. Stiven, 
Director, School of Music (Smith Memorial Hall) 



Tuesday— 3:00 p.m. 
General Session — Auditorium 

Tuesday — 4:30 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. 

A trip thru Mexico. Mary A. McKee (First Floor Gym., 
W Oman's Bldg.) 



Wednesday — January 13 



Wednesday — 9:00 a.m. 

Textiles for decoration. 1 Eda Jacobsen (Lincoln Hall 
Theater) 

How to buy vegetables. J. W. Lloyd, Hort. (Morrow 
Hall) 

Wednesday— 10:00 a.m. 

General Session for Homemakers — Lincoln 
Hall Theater 

Home economics research and the homemaker. Mrs. 
Pauline Beery Mack, Director, Home Economics 
Research, Pennsylvania State College, State College 

Group music for homemakers. Fannie Buchanan, Ex- 
tension Assistant, Rural Sociology in Rural Organiza- 
tion, Iowa State College, Ames 



Wednesday — 1:00 p.m. 

Organization round table for county and unit home-bureau 
officers.* (Morrow Hall) 

Repeated at a later session. 

[18] 



Round table for home bureau recreation leaders.* Mrs. 
Spencer Ewing, Bloomington, presiding (First Floor 
Gym., Woman's Bldg.) 

What is a well-fitted garment? Mks. Mary BEAM (Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 

Wednesday— 2:00 p.m. 

Organization round table for county and unit home-bureau 
officers* (Morrow Hall) 

Round table for home-bureau recreation leaders.* Mrs. 
Spencer Ewing, Bloomington, presiding (First Floor 
Gym., Woman's Bldg.) 

Nutrition and good health. Milicent Hathaway (Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 

Wednesday— 3:00 p.m. 
General Session — Auditorium 



Wednesday — 4:30 p.m. 

Reading — James Whitcomb Riley. H. G. Paul, Depart- 
ment of English (Lincoln Hall Theater) 



Thursday — January 14 



Thursday— 9:00 a.m. 

Textiles for decoration. Eda Jacobsen (Second Floor 
Parlors, Woman's Bldg.) 

Planning three meals a day. Harriet Barto (Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 



Thursday— 10:00 a.m. 

General Session for Homemakers — Lincoln 
Hall Theater 

Making the most of human resources in the family. Ruth 
Lindquist, East Lansing, Michigan 

Trends in program development. 

Financial planning for the home. Mrs. Floyd Seltzer, 
Peoria County. Family living as a major project. 
Mrs. Wagner Clark, Hancock County. Coordinat- 
ing resources for health. Mrs. Richard Graves, 
Vermilion County. Meeting varied interests thru 
special groups. Mrs. E. E. Hahnenstein, Kane 
County. Some results of long-time planning for 
kitchen improvement. Mrs. John Weyhrich, Mason 
County. Cooperation with rural youth. Mrs. Turner 
Foley, Adams County. 



Thursday— 1:00 p.m. 

Personality development in the home. H. H. Anderson, 
Department of Psychology (Lincoln Hall Theater) 

Appreciation of radio symphony music. F. B. Stiven, 
Director, School of Music (Smith Memorial Hall) 



[19] 



Selecting electrical equipment. R. R. Parks, Agr. Engin. 
(S£cond Floor Parlors, Woman's Bldg.) 

Thursday 2:00 p.m. 

Porcelain enamel. A. I. Andrews, Department of Ceramic 
Engineering {Second Floor Parlors, Woman's Bldg.) 

Wise use of credit. L. J. Norton, Agr. Econ. {Lincoln 
Hall Theater) 

Thursday— 3:00 p.m. 
General Session — Auditorium 



Friday — January 15 



Friday— 9:00 a.m. 

Question clinic — construction, materials, and small houses. 
L. H. Provine, Head, Department of Architecture 
{120 Arch.) 

Selecting varieties of soybeans for use as food. 
Sybil Woodruff {Lincoln Hall Theater) 



Friday— 10:00 a.m. 

General Session for Homemakers — Lincoln 
Hall Theater 

Some administrative problems connected with rural 
schools. T. E. Benner, Dean, College of Education 



Friday— 11:00 a.m. 
General Session — Auditorium 



[20] 



SPECIAL 
CONFERENCES 



Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders Association 

The Illinois Brown Swiss Breeders Association will 
hold their annual winter meeting on Tuesday, January 12, 
at 10 a.m. in Room 302 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Jersey Cattle Club 

The annual meeting of the Illinois Jersey Cattle Club 
will be held on Wednesday, January 13, at 10 a.m. in 
Room 302 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Guernsey Breeders Association 

The annual winter meeting of the Illinois Guernsey 
Breeders Association will be held on Thursday, January 
14, at 10 a.m. in Room 302 Old Agriculture. 

Illinois Crop Improvement Association 

The annual business meeting of the Illinois Crop Im- 
provement Association will be held on Wednesday, January 
13, at 4:00 p.m. in Morrow Hall, Old Agriculture. 

The annual banquet of the Illinois Crop Improvement 
Association will be held in the McKinley Foundation on 
Wednesday, January 13, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Following 
the dinner medals will be awarded to winners in the Ten- 
Acre Corn-Growing Contest as well as in the Utility Corn 
Show. Everyone attending Farm and Home Week is in- 
vited to attend. (See Wednesday program, page 11) 

Annual School for Grain Judges 

During Farm and Home Week the Department of 
Agronomy and the Illinois Crop Improvement Association 
conduct a school for seed and grain judges. At the con- 
clusion of the school an examination is held and certifi- 
cates of "Certified Grain Judge" are awarded to those who 
successfully complete the week's work and pass the exam- 
ination. Scheduled work will be given from 8 to 9 a.m. 
and 4 to 6 p.m. with an opportunity for individual practice 
during the day. The first meeting will be held on Monday, 
January 11, at 11 a.m. in Room 110 Old Agriculture. Spe- 
cial emphasis will be given to corn and small grains this 
year. 

Illinois Turkey Growers' Association 

The Illinois Turkey Growers' Association will hold an 
all-day meeting at Urbana on Friday, January 15. In the 
morning they will meet with the poultry management 
group in Room 316 New Agriculture. The afternoon pro- 
gram will be devoted to matters of special interest to 
turkey producers. 

Young Peoples' Fireside Forums 

Each morning between 8:00 and 8:50 a.m. an informal 
discussion will be held for young men in the University 
Y.M.C.A. lounge and for young women in the Second 
Floor Parlors in the Woman's Building. Young men and 
women who live on farms, who have not yet married, and 
are out of school, are especially invited to attend these 
Forums. 

[21] 



PASTORS' AND LAYMEN'S CONFERENCE 

(214 New Agriculture) 

Improving conditions in rural communities 

Tuesday 

D. E. Lindstrom, Chairman 
10:00-11:30 The rural life section of the Catholic Church. 
Rev. H. B. Schnelten, Director, Diocesan 
Rural Life Bureau, Diocese of Springfield, 
Brussels. The rural emphasis in the pro- 
gram of the Illinois Church Council. Rev. 
Charles E. Shike, Executive Secretary, 
Illinois Church Council, Springfield. The 
rural life program of the Missouri Synod 
Lutheran Church. Rev. P. F. Plunkett, St. 
John's Lutheran Church, Effingham. The 
rural life program of the United Lutheran 
Church in America. Rev. Frank H. 
Schroer, Pearl City-Kent Lutheran Parish, 
Pearl City. The services of the seminaries to 
rural life. S. E. Kincheloe, Professor of 
Ethics, Chicago Theological Seminary, Chicago 

Wednesday 

D. E. Lindstrom, Chairman 
10:00-11:30 The rural life program of the Farm Bureau. 
G. E. Metzger, Field Secretary and Organi- 
zation Director, Illinois Agricultural Asso- 
ciation, Chicago. The Grange in rural life. 
E. A. Eckert, Master, Illinois State Grange, 
Mascoutah. The rural life program of the 
Home Bureau. Mrs. J. V. Stevenson, 
President, Illinois Home Bureau Federation, 
Streator. How Prairie Farmer and W L S 
serve rural life in Illinois. Casper Mast, 
Assistant Editor, Prairie Farmer, Chicago. 
Rural life programs of teachers' colleges. 
L. W. Hacker, Director, Division of Rural 
Education, Illinois State Normal University, 
Normal. The rural life program of the Ex- 
tension Service. D. E. Lindstrom 

Thursday 

R. E. Hieronymus, Chairman 
10:00-11:30 Services of the Department of Agriculture to 
rural life. W. W. McLaughlin, Director, 
Department of Agriculture, Springfield. 
How the Department of Public Welfare 
serves rural life. J. H. Andrews, Superin- 
tendent of Division of Old Age Assistance, 
Department of Public Welfare, Springfield. 
Public Health services to improve rural life. 
B. K. Richardson, Chief, Division of Public 
Health Instruction, Springfield. Conserva- 
tion and rural life in Illinois. C. R. Hill, 
Assistant Director, Department of Conser- 
vation, Springfield. Rural life programs in 
the schools. John A. Wieland, Superinten- 
dent of Public Instruction, Springfield. 
Rural life emphasis in Works Progress Ad- 
ministration. M. H. Bickham, Director, 
Labor Relations, Works Progress Adminis- 
tration, Chicago. How the State Library 
serves rural life. Hallie Warner, Acting 
Superintendent, Extension Division, Illinois 
State Library, Springfield 

[22] 



ILLINOIS FARM MANAGERS 
ASSOCIATION 

Annual Meeting — Thursday, January 14 
(Bradley Arcade) 
9:00 a.m. Soybean production. J. C. Hackleman 

10:00 New uses for soybeans. O. E. May, Director, 

Regional Soybean Industrial Products Lab- 
oratory, U. S. D. A., Urbana 

11:00 Trip thru the new Soybean Laboratory 

12:00 Lunch (Bradley Arcade) 

1:30 p.m. Trends in land value. T. D. Morse, Doane 
Agricultural Service, St. Louis. 

Discussion 
3:00 Outlook for 1937. E. J. Working 

4:00 1937 insect hazards. W. P. Flint 

4:30 Business meeting 

6:30 Dinner and Evening Session (Bradley Arcade) 

(Joint session of Illinois Farm Managers Asso- 
ciation and American Society of Farm Man- 
agers and Rural Appraisers) 
What the farmer should know when selling 
his grain. Mark W. Pickell, Statistician, 
Pickell and Daniel Market Service, Chicago 
Annual report from the president of each of 
the societies 



[23] 



EXHIBITS 



Illinois Seed Grain Show 

The Illinois Seed Grain Show and the Seventeenth 
Annual Utility Corn Show will be held in connection with 
Farm and Home Week, on the Fourth Floor of the New 
Agriculture Building. 

The Corn Show will be open to visitors at 4 p.m. Mon- 
day, January 11, and will remain open thruout the week. 
The best hours to visit the show are 8 a.m. and from 4 to 
6 p.m. daily. 

Agricultural Engineering 

On display at the Agricultural Engineering Building 
will be found power and field machinery, tractors, home 
equipment, building materials, soil erosion control ma- 
chinery, and plans and models of farm buildings. Rural 
electrification exhibits will also be on display. 

Motion pictures will be shown in the building each 
day during the noon hour and at 5 p.m. Students will 
operate a lunch stand in the building. 

Agronomy 

Exhibits pertaining to soils and crops will be on display 
from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. daily on the Fourth Floor of 
the New Agriculture Building. Of special interest will be 
the hybrid corn exhibit. 

Animal Husbandry 

A pathological museum of animal diseases may be seen 
in the Animal Pathology Laboratory from 8:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. daily. 

The purebred and experimental herds and flocks main- 
tained on the South Farm may be seen at the same hours. 

Dairy Husbandry 

Plant practices and operation in the preparation of the 
various dairy products may be observed in the Dairy 
Manufactures Building. The best time to see the plant in 
operation is between 6:00 a.m. and noon. 

Home Economics 

The home economics exhibit will be on display in 
Gregorian Hall (fourth floor of the Woman's Building) 
from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. daily. Nutrition with emphasis 
on soybeans, textiles, including phases of consumer infor- 
mation, home architecture showing plans for farm and 
urban homes, children's homemade toys, and electrical 
equipment will be featured during the week. 

Horticulture 

Tomatoes and other vegetables grown under glass dur- 
ing the winter months can be seen at the Vegetable 
Greenhouse. An exhibit of potatoes can be seen on the 
Fourth Floor of the New Agriculture Building. 

At the Floriculture Greenhouse the more commonly 
grown greenhouse flowers, as well as many lesser known 
kinds, will be on display. 

[24] 



Nut fruits and disease specimens arc on display in the 
front hall of the Horticulture Field Laboratory. 

Publications 

Bulletins, circulars, and other available printed infor- 
mation of the College of Agriculture are on display at the 
Auditorium, where cards are also available on which one 
can make request for any of the publications desired. 
Anyone wishing his name added to the mailing list for 
announcements of future publications may also so indicate. 

Museums 

TJic Classical Archaeology and Art, European Culture, 
and Oriental Museums, located on the top floor of Lin- 
coln Hall, and the Natural History Museum, on the third 
and fourth floors of the Natural History Building, are 
open to Farm and Home Week visitors. 



Regional Soybean Laboratory Open House 

Dr. O. E. May and associates of the Regional Soybean 
Laboratory will hold Open House for Farm and Home 
Week visitors from 4:15 to 5:15 p.m. on Monday, Tues- 
day, Wednesday, and Thursday in Room 218, Old Agri- 
culture Building. The equipment of this new laboratory 
will be of interest to those who are interested in the 
development of industrial uses of the soybean. 

University Library Browsing Room 

The Browsing Room on the second floor of the Uni- 
versity Library will be open to Farm and Home Week 
visitors during the entire week. 

Varsity Basketball Practice 

Farm and Home Week visitors are welcome to sit in 
on varsity basketball practice sessions at the New Gym- 
nasium from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, 
and Thursday afternoons. The only requirements are that 
people sit in the balcony and keep relatively quiet in order 
to avoid hindering coaching instruction. 



[25] 



MEMORANDA 



3 0112 105729427